The Gods

Mongol culture has many deities, some from ancient shamanic traditions, others from Tibetan Buddhist heritage.

Burkut

Burkut

Burkut is the Eagle God. He is often portrayed on top of the Ulukayın (Tree of Earth), and it is said he is the bird with copper talons, whose right wing covers the sun, and whose left covers the moon. For our game, we have depicted him incarnated as one of the eagle hunters of Bayan-Ölgii. Burkut’s Ulus — his vision for the future of the Mongol lands — is to create a wildlife refuge for all creatures.

 

 

Etügen Eke

Etügen Eke

Etügen Eke (“Mother Earth”), is an Earth goddess who lived in the middle of the Universe, patroness of the Homeland and nature. All living beings are subordinate to her. The dominant role in determining the fate of people and nations belongs to Tengri, but natural forces yield to Etügen. She is generally considered a benevolent goddess. To appease the goddess Etügen, sacrifices are made every spring in preparation for the cattle-breeding season and before planting crops. Sacrifices were also conducted near rivers and on the banks of lakes in the autumn, after the completion of the harvest. Etügen is often represented as a beautiful young woman riding a grey bull. Her Ulus is an empire of herding, farming, and nomadic self-sufficiency.

 

Lobsogoi

Lobsogoi

Lobsogoi, who appears in the Buryat version of the Geser epic, is a trickster demon born from the backside of the slain Atai Ulan, king of the malicious gods of the East. He is a minor figure in Mongol mythology; his appearance in ULUS is therefore a kind of promotion. He has no vision for the future of the Mongol lands other than chaos and disorder.

 

 

Mergen

Mergen

Mergen is a deity of abundance and wisdom. He is often depicted as a young man with a helmet and a bow riding on a white horse, with a bow and arrow in one hand. He lives on the seventh floor of sky. Mergen symbolizes intelligence and thought. His Ulus is an empire of scholarship, and learning.

 

 

Tengri

Tengri

Tengri, the sky god, was the chief deity worshipped by the ruling class of the Central Asian steppe peoples from the 6th to the 9th century. He was the god who created all things, father of the sun and the moon. Tengri was sometimes personified as a pure, white goose that flies constantly over an endless expanse of water, which represents time. Beneath this water, Ak Ana, the White Mother, calls out to him saying “Create!” His Ulus is an ever-expanding empire of manufacturing, commerce, and trade.

 

 

Ulgen

Ülgen

Ülgen symbolizes goodness, welfare, abundance of food and water. In addition, he controls the atmospheric events and movements of stars. He creates land for people to live on, the heads of both humans and animals and the rainbow. He was regarded as the patron god of shamans, and the source of their knowledge. In Turkic and Mongolian mythology, the birch tree, regarded as a cosmic axis between earth and sky, was regarded as sacred to him, as was the horse. His Ulus is an empire of spirituality.

 

 

Umay

Umay

Umay is a protector of women, children, and the disadvantaged. Umay is always depicted together with a child. There are only rare exceptions to this. It is believed that when Umay leaves a child for a long time, the child gets ill and shamans are involved to call Umay back. The smiling of a sleeping baby shows Umay is near it and crying means that Umay has left. Umay helps people to obtain more food and goods and gives them luck. As Umay is associated with the sun, she is called Sarı Kız,  or Yellow Maiden, and yellow is her color and symbol. She is depicted as having sixty golden tresses that look like the rays of the sun. Her Ulus is an empire where social justice prevails, and no Mongol child goes hungry.

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